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Alex is a multi-instrumentalist, composer and producer from Sydney, Australia. He founded the post-rock band sleepmakeswaves, with which he has toured Asia, America, Europe and Australia. In his spare time he writes music for short films, produces bands and subsists on altogether too much coffee. Alex is the instructor of the free Soundfly course, Live Clicks and Backing Tracks.

Source-Connect Now is a similar product, but it’s free! If you have the budget, however, I recommend ipDTL because it has greater mixing capabilities and is more common in the industry, making it easier to work with other companies and voice talent. That being said, when just beginning, Source-Connect Now can certainly get the job done. Both services offer a private link to send to your guests and allow you to have more than one guest in different locations. It’s just like connecting via Skype, but at a much better quality. As long as you both have a solid internet connection and suitable recording environments, your interview will sound great. You didn’t even have to leave your bedroom!

Jeremy is a Montreal-based musician, sound artist and improviser who loves giving advice to emerging artists on how to make their tours more effective. He writes, records and performs electroacoustic “concrète” music for tape, oscillators and amplified objects and surfaces, as well as solo guitar. He has performed and released material throughout Europe and the UK, Asia, the US and Canada, mostly with his trio Sontag Shogun.

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Brown proved he was a different type of entertainer with this album. Although he isn’t doing anything new, yet, the way he directed the band and interacted with the audience felt revolutionary. He took what other band leaders were doing and upped the ante, upped the energy, and all-around raised the bar to set a new normal for how flamboyant and confident an entertainer should be. His exuberance can be heard throughout the performance.

Picture the traditional scene of a “music creation team” in a studio — in attendance you may find the artist, the band, the manager, possibly the A&R rep of the label, the audio engineer, etc. Maybe you’ve hired a team of songwriters and curated a set of songs to record from their work. These roles are the traditional puzzle pieces required to produce good music.

Mickey’s got a serious talent for writing relatable, bittersweet lyrics. You can rock out to his growing pain, while his bright guitar soothes. His live shows are pretty rare these days, so make an effort to catch him!

Born in Tokyo, Japan in 1947, Ischi was a self-described “loner” who had a difficult time fitting in. He heard yodeling on the radio as a child and became obsessed with the sound of it. It clearly made a massive impact on him, because his life was set on a completely different course after that.

Carter Lee is a bassist/educator/producer. He is originally from Edmonton, Canada and now resides in Brooklyn, NY. In addition to leading the hip-hop group, Tiger Speak, Lee is the music director for the bands of both Shea Rose and Moruf. He is also a sideman for countless other artists. Carter brings his wealth of experience in many different musical situations to the Soundfly team and is eager to help any musician who is hoping to better their band. Check out his course Building a Better Band on Soundfly today!

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Not only does Vinyltryk seek to offer solutions to these problems, it’s also building an eco-friendly press which cuts down on electricity and recycles its cooling water.

It has gone down in history as one of the most epic Super Bowl performances ever, and these halftime shows are already pretty epic in and of themselves. In 40 years, it had never rained at a Super Bowl, and Prince really brought the party with four absolutely perfect songs for the occasion, and, of course, the one. “Purple Rain” is later in the video, but the whole thing is a good watch.

A chaconne is supposed to be a dance, right? Bach wrote those note values the way he wrote them for a reason. Did he really want performers to assign any length they felt like assigning them? My gut tells me that he didn’t. I suspect that he probably played his own music in tempo, maybe with some phrasing and ornamentation but still with a clearly recognizable beat. I imagine him gritting his teeth at the rubato that modern performers use. Maybe that’s just me projecting my own preferences, but this sense comes from listening to a lot of Bach and performing some, too.

Soundfly welcomes new voices each month to offer unique perspectives, shine a light on unexpected musical worlds, and help our readers find their sound.

It’s totally fair to assume this song is in C minor. Sure, C minor chords shows up here and there, and much of the melodic content could be attributed to the C minor pentatonic scale. I wouldn’t blame anyone for thinking this song is in C minor.